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Comments

Jan

Thanks for posting this, Dana.

There are so many elements to book marketing that it's easy to get overwhelmed. So it's important to start with the fundamentals. Your book marketing plan workshop is a great place to get direction and focus, and then a writer's website will be an important part of carrying out that plan.

Dana Lynn Smith

Jan, thanks for sharing your wise advice with my readers. Defining target markets is really important and it's one of the first things that I advise authors to do when developing their book marketing plans.

Fiona Ingram

Thanks for an excellent post. A website is also a way of adding things that readers might enjoy, and perhaps these are elements you can't include in your book/s. I write for MG and my book website also takes young readers behind the scenes, giving them bonus info and extra chapters. Any website can include those added value elements that make readers feel as if they are getting just that litle bit extra that counts.

Jan

That's a good idea, Fiona. Posting additional content from your books' world can bring your true fans back for more and more, as they eagerly await the next book.

Kirabutler

Good foundational post.

I'd also add for consideration: scalability and a solid design that reflects your personal brand and that adapts to the various platforms where media is consumed (desktop, mobile, feed readers, etc.) Responsive site design is good, and an opensource CMS platform like WordPress has many themes that suit this particular use. (Not that I'm advocating WordPress in particular, but it's a good starting point for people who have no experience with front end web development and who don't want to spend a chunk of change on professional services.)

Design is often overlooked, as authors oftentimes don't look beyond the immediate and necessary: opting for outdated technologies or focusing on their immediate needs (designing for one book release is oftentimes drastically different than designing a site that will expand with an author's growing portfolio.)

Inasmuch as typography is concerned: I would have to disagree with your point on the limited selection:

Web 2.0 is a great step forward for typophiles, as type decisions need not be limited to serif/sans serif in their most basic (Arial/Helvetica/Times) any longer. Services (both free and paid) like TypeKit and GoogleFonts offer substantial libraries that move above and beyond system-based stock type choices (thank heavens.) System-based fonts are a thing of the past, and even if you don't know the difference between CSS and PHP, they offer walk-throughs for implementation for noobies to web programming.

Cancer Treatment

That's a good idea, Fiona. Posting additional content from your books' world can bring your true fans back for more and more, as they eagerly await the next book.

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Update

  • The Savvy Book Marketer podcast, guidebooks and training programs are no longer available, but the blog articles will remain online for a while.

    Thank you to everyone who has supported the Savvy Book Marketer website, and I wish you much success with your books! Dana Lynn Smith